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Eric Cantor
Eric Cantor
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's big rebranding speech was, of course, all warm and cuddly new face to the same old Republican ideas. Education is especially well fitted to that effort, since conservative think tanks have spent a decade marketing corporate education policy as being basically a new civil rights movement. Speaking Tuesday, Cantor fitted himself right into that frame even as he touted vouchers, charter schools, and for-profit higher education.

Cantor highlighted the voucher program imposed on Washington, D.C., by the federal government, pointing to a success story from the program. But while there are doubtless individual successes from any such program, just as there are individual successes at traditional public schools, according to a 2010 Department of Education study, there was "no conclusive evidence" that the D.C. voucher program improved student reading or math scores; the only improvement found was about a 12 percent increase in students' chances of graduating from high school.

A program that slightly improves the graduation rates of very small numbers of students is Eric Cantor's big idea? Well, no. Really, Cantor's big idea is to find an infinite number of ways to shift education funding around—preferably out of traditional public schools—without increasing funding or really paying any attention to whether all these new way to shift funding around actually improve outcomes. So he pushes vouchers as if they were more effective than they are, and he pushes charter schools even though their results are mixed at best and, overall, probably slightly worse than traditional public schools. Oh, and of course both vouchers and charters also fit a privatization agenda, funneling money out of a public school system that serves all kids and into religious schools and charters run by management companies that make off with big fees.

Similarly, Cantor lamented the high cost of college tuition without acknowledging that the major reason students are paying more is because per-student public higher education funding has fallen dramatically over the past 25 years, even as a college degree has become more and more essential to getting a good job. And he promised that "We will encourage entrepreneurship in higher education, including for-profit schools." For-profit colleges charge higher tuition than community colleges and state universities, have high drop-out rates, and produce nearly half of all federal student loan defaults despite only enrolling around 10 percent of students. But they do produce private profits, so yay!

All of Cantor's big, warm, fuzzy, rebranded Republican ideas on education boil down to this: Don't increase education funding. Rather, move the existing pool of public funding out of public educational institutions. If you can move it into private hands, so much the better. But if you can keep moving the same money into different programs, regardless of their track records, you have a better chance of keeping people from noticing that you're not actually investing in their kids any more, you're just changing the form of the existing investment in education. You know, the one the Republican Party is always trying to cut.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Labor on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 12:49 PM PST.

Also republished by In Support of Labor and Unions, Virginia Kos, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Every time a Republican pushes vouchers... (7+ / 0-)

    ...Democrats should propose that the taxes be doubled to pay for it "temporarily", particularly by amendments.

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 12:56:11 PM PST

    •  I have always stated that I will accept vouchers (6+ / 0-)

      the day that all schools must accept and pay for all students - including special needs - out of the vouchers without additional support. And, if the costs go up, the charter school eats those costs - just like public schools.

      In Colorado, a charter school gets the "per pupil" payment but passes additional costs back to the "parent" public school.

      Vouchers are also a way to continue to defund special needs students.

      Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it - Samuel Clemens

      by tjlord on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 01:13:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I will accept vouchers ONLY (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bwren, lippythelion69, a2nite, Shippo1776

        the day those of us with no children also get a similar rebate on our taxes. If they're going to hand families education welfare checks out of the money I pay for public schools, then I need to get back a check for the same amount each year. I'm sick of sending freeloaders to schools run by religions I don't subscribe to.

        Jon Husted is a dick.

        by anastasia p on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 01:19:19 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'd add that each school taking tax money must (6+ / 0-)

        have a governing board that is elected by the parents, subject to annual election, and prorate the cost of the school district's special education costs to these schools, regardless of how many they choose to accept.  School lunch and breakfast and aftercare programs should also be included as needed. Costs for any specified uniforms, books, etc. shall not be passed directly to parents.  Costs for religious order members teaching in these schools shall be covered by the church, not the tax paying public, and such classes are to be optional to students. Facilities should meet state and federal guidelines, requirements, etc. for 'accessibility' to the disabled.

        Charter schools should be held to the same or higher standards than the public schools as far as testing, evaluation, and include annual background checks on all employees.  The district administration should review any faculty or facility deficiency and security related concerns as soon as possible, with the charter schools accomodating as directed and with transparency and accountability to the public. The same for concerns about any specific teacher or staff serving at the school. The district should be testing, reviewing, doing background checks and evaluating every teacher utilized in private and charter schools to educate children for whom tax dollars are provided.

        Also, I'd argue that they cannot suspend a student without providing a private tutorial program for this student--such a suspended student is not to be forced back onto the public district's schools. If they arrange a transfer the student whom they'd suspend to another charter school, this also should be monitored by the district. Any special needs and issues ought to be a part of the transfer review, and the district administration should be included in supervising the success of this transfer and intake and services provided.

        Individual Education Programs (Special Education IEPs) which any charter school student should have really ought to be supervised by the district's Special Education department, with charter schools paying for this administrative cost. The cost of funding specialty area teachers, and speech therapists, school psychologists, Occupational and Physical Therapy, etc. all needs to be prorated as well.  Children transferred with IEPs to a charter school ought to have at least quarterly reviews by district staff to ensure IEPs are followed and not discontinued without sufficient reasons.

        Gifted & Talented kids deserve their own IEPs, as specified by Federal law, with an appropriately advanced curriculum taught by teachers certified and trained for these programs.  These kids are not to be made use of as in-class 'teachers' for other students in regular classes.  It is not unusual for charter schools to just include these kids in the regular curriculum, which either bores them or which they ace without effort. It also is common for charter schools to 'cherry pick', accepting the C+ to B+/A- kids, and not take any kid with academic performance outside of somewhat above average. It's far cheaper to educate kids able to move at the same pace. Makes it easier to look good on testing as well.

        All texts and curriculum materials used in a charter school should meet the approval of the public school Curriculum department and state Department of Education, and teachers be certified (even if a 'religious' school). Charter schools must provide equivalent or better computer, physical education facilities and science labs.  Progress of every class through the curriculum should be monitored by the school district administration.

        When life gives you wingnuts, make wingnut butter!

        by antirove on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 01:54:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nice list (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          antirove, pacplate

          Although maybe every 4 years is good enough for board election, and probably some means to allow the community to participate in general is wise, just as a typical public school would have.

          Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

          by elfling on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 02:15:13 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm thinking if terms go longer than say 2 years (0+ / 0-)

            there is a risk of loss of interest on the part of a parent whose kids no longer attend the school.  So I think it's important that it is real stakeholders, with current live interests, driving that localized school board.  

            That said, I do appreciate your comment and the reasonableness of it.  The annual term is probably a bit too short. There could also be a 'term limit' wherein if one no longer has a child attending, one can and ought to step down from that board.  My concern is avoiding a situation where board members may neglect to do their best on behalf of all the parents and kids. That can be met more than one way.

            When life gives you wingnuts, make wingnut butter!

            by antirove on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 03:29:51 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  There is a steep learning curve (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              pacplate, antirove

              (I am a school board trustee.)

              My experience is that it wasn't until I had two years under my belt that I had a good grasp of the arcane and the various issues in play in my very small school district. (The whole district is probably about the size of an urban charter school.) Learning to decipher budgets, to figure out what you don't know that needs to be poked at, to have the confidence and standing with the school staff to be able to ask really thoughtful and constructive questions, it takes time.

              I would also say that having a child in the school isn't the end-all be-all. I am lucky to serve with a group of trustees that really cares about all kids and their education. I have served with trustees who are former employees, who have kids currently in school, whose kids have graduated, and with trustees who never had any connection to our particular schools before joining the board. What matters is that they listen; that they care about all kids; that they are thoughtful about what they say and how they comport themselves.

              In fact, having a child in the school creates the occasional complication. There's nothing quite so delicate as having to have a discussion with a teacher who knows me only as a board member, especially if I have a concern like 'too much homework' or the like.

              Public schools belong to the community, not just to the parents. The parents are transient ... unless they have a whole passel of kids stepping through. :-)

              Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

              by elfling on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 04:14:09 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  In Colorado, we term limit school boards (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                elfling

                Every eight years you have to relearn. My wife's board had 100% turn over one election.

                Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it - Samuel Clemens

                by tjlord on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 07:40:09 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I don't see the point of term limits (0+ / 0-)

                  People naturally come and go as their kids get older and their interest moves on. In our case, the board position is volunteer... Occasionally I get a piece of cake or something.

                  Our board has staggered elections so you wouldn't expect to have more than 3 new board members.

                  As a practical matter, just finding 5 good people who are interested in the job is a challenge - we usually go out recruiting when there's an opening. I ran unopposed for my seat.

                  Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

                  by elfling on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 09:49:30 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  What do you mean by "additional costs?" (0+ / 0-)
        •  If the charter school hires a dedicated teaching (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          elfling

          assistant, the "parent school" pays for that person - even if they are not a member of that district's union.

          Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it - Samuel Clemens

          by tjlord on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 07:41:09 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  The home district is usually responsible (0+ / 0-)

          for any special costs of a special needs student. This could be as small as special transportation to get the student to a more appropriate school, or it could be as high as 5 figure private school tuition at a special needs school. It can also be about paying for a dedicated aide.

          Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

          by elfling on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 09:59:01 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  So let me get this straight (0+ / 0-)

            When a special needs student moves schools, they still get an aide.  That is bad?

            I fail to see how there are additional costs here. If they needed the aide at the former school, the aide moves with the student.

            There's nothing additional. And before you say the charter school decided on its own to get an additional aide, I would caution against speculating or second guessing professionals who make those decisions (the charter school doesn't).

            •  But the charter school doesn't pay for it (0+ / 0-)

              The student's home public school is obligated to pay those costs, out of their per-student budget

              So public schools have to stretch their budgets across the potentially dramatic extra costs of special needs children, but a charter school does not.

              Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

              by elfling on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 08:07:35 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  P.S. DailyKos is ruining my day (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mostel26, a2nite, liz dexic, begone

    due to the large number of photos it is publishing of sneering sociapath Eric Can'tor.

    Jon Husted is a dick.

    by anastasia p on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 01:19:53 PM PST

  •  creeping Rheeism (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mostel26, cocinero, itzik shpitzik
    And he promised that "We will encourage entrepreneurship in higher education, including for-profit schools." For-profit colleges charge higher tuition than community colleges and state universities, have high drop-out rates, and produce nearly half of all federal student loan defaults despite only enrolling around 10 percent of students. But they do produce private profits, so yay!

    Warning - some snark above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ "We're like a strip club with a million bouncers and no strippers." (HBO's Real Time, January 18, 2013)

    by annieli on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 05:39:00 PM PST

  •  Re (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cocinero
    the only improvement found was about a 12 percent increase in students' chances of graduating from high school.
    The graduation rate is worthless information anyway without a third party assessment like a test. A 12% increase in graduation rates could just be a 12% reduction in grading standards.

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 07:34:23 PM PST

    •  For a left libertarian, you are big on regulation (0+ / 0-)

      and oversight.

      There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

      by upstate NY on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:10:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Whether you have public or private schools (0+ / 0-)

        You need accountability to determine whether they are actually doing their jobs, or not.

        (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
        Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

        by Sparhawk on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 12:37:53 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Who says those idiotic tests determine (0+ / 0-)

          accountability?

          For 100 years, we've done it with principals.

          There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

          by upstate NY on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:33:28 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  How do you know if the principals are? (0+ / 0-)

            Under your model, you eventually have to 'take someone's word for it' and rely solely on the professionalism and ability of someone you don't know and who has every incentive to be self-serving.

            But statistics and properly-run tests never lie. I can know whether students in a school can read, do math, or not without needing to take someone's word for it.

            (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
            Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

            by Sparhawk on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 05:26:23 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Education is not a commodity (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cocinero

    and so I'm not clear why we need private alternatives at all.

    If it is in the public interest to have an eduated populace, then the public should be responsible for seeing to it that the education provided is appropriate.

    The school-district level is too low; my gut feeling is that the national level is too high. Unfortunately, the US has such overlapping yet rigid middle layers that what's needed may not be possible now.

    Maybe this whole education thing needs to be rethought from the bottom up.

  •  What's the difference between a private school (0+ / 0-)

    and a for-profit college?

    There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

    by upstate NY on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:10:50 AM PST

  •  Charter schools are good. (1+ / 1-)
    Recommended by:
    GregColeman
    Hidden by:
    irishwitch

    Why should only the rich have access to good schools? Vouchers would let the poor send their children to schools' they can only dream of. This proposal was even adopted in socialist Sweden, and it produced good results.

  •  For Profit Colleges = Diploma Mills (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    madronagal, tommyfocus2003

    Pay Money.
    Get Degree.
    No skill necessarily required

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:07:24 PM PST

    •  First get a gov't guaranteed loan (0+ / 0-)

      Then turn it over to the college (i.e. corporation).
      Next either
        A. drop out, or
        B. get a worthless degree
      Then default on the loan (no job)
      Finally, the taxpayers pay the bank to cover the guaranteed loan.

      Results: The for-profit college CEO is richer. The banker is richer. The taxpayer was fleeced. The student is still dumb but now has permanent debt and no credit.

  •  The backdrop of his mantra was AEI (0+ / 0-)

    The koch bros owned and paid for American Enterprise Institute is a sociopathic organization whose employee's are paid to overthrow the Constitution and make Americans slaves to the wealthy!
    Cancer (cantor) is a tool of the mentally ill.
    Deal w/the mental illness of the right wing billionaires and all other problems in America are manageable!!! Everything else is a distraction from their mental illness.

    "If you want to make G-D smile, tell him your plans." Vin Scully

    by BrianParker14 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:23:14 PM PST

  •  He's a conservative from VA (0+ / 0-)

    This was the state that would rather close its public schools than let them be integrated in the 1950s.  

    Is it any surprise that he wants to privatize the educational system so that those who can afford it (NOT poor minorities) can get the best education?

    To be free and just depends on us. Victor Hugo.

    by dizzydean on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:27:04 PM PST

  •  Dept. of Education (0+ / 0-)

    I think the D.O.E. ought to return the money they spent on semi automatic shotguns, the kind police officers use, spend the money on computer labs at schools, or to perhaps upgrade basic services to inner city schools, which seem to get hammered from every direction.

  •  The Republican Party is a cesspool. (0+ / 0-)

    A really well funded candidate could take him out.....

  •  Their new plan is to (0+ / 0-)

    smile more.

  •  I have to chime in (0+ / 0-)

    Charter schools DO NOT funnel money away from public schools. Embarrassing that such a mistake shows up on the front page.

    ISDs get money per pupil, charter schools get money per pupil. When the kid leaves, the money follows.

    The real fact is that charters do as much will less money, because at least in Texas, charters get no money for facilities.

    Laura, you should post a correction- or forever hang your head in shame.

    •  It's not that simple (0+ / 0-)

      First, the rules are different state to state.

      In California, money does follow the kid on a day to day basis. That is, they are paid daily for the kids who come to school that day.

      In other states, there is A Magic Day and schools are paid for their enrollment based on that day. Some charter schools have had the habit of having remarkably more kids enrolled on Magic Day than on Test Day in the spring, as the kids who 'aren't working out' are counseled back to their home public school during the year.

      Second, they do take kids away from public schools with their money, which can create financial difficulties and some financial uncertainty for the home public school. You may feel this is OK, but there certainly are public schools who have to lay off teachers because of a charter. Typically, the charters take families with more interest and motivation about education, just because it requires effort to enroll and transport a child in a charter. They don't have as many struggling families or serious special ed kids.

      Charters don't have all the financial responsibilities that public schools have. They don't pay for transportation and they don't usually have to have meal services. They don't usually have high need special ed kids, and they don't have responsibility for high need kids who live in their service area but attend other schools.

      The per-student cost is set up as an average. The reality is that there are some students who cost much much more and some who cost less to educate.

      Finally, many charters (check out KIPP in Texas for example) are set up to get substantial grants from outside funders, and it's typical to require parents to volunteer a certain number of hours a year. When you count all their funding, KIPP in Texas is spending substantially more per student than a public school. That's great, and I applaud that - but it's not sustainable as a model for educating all of America's kids.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 10:15:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  My reply (0+ / 0-)

        "Some charter schools."  I'd be interested in any and all data you have to clarify that statement.

        As to your second point, just repeating the same point over again doesn't make it true. Actually, what you say after that is for the most part completely untrue.  Charter schools by and large operate as open enrollment schools, and they take students with special needs just like other schools. I know from personal experience- but I don't know if you read that somewhere and are just repeating it,

        If charters don't provide transportation or food, that would seem to be a reason charters have a disadvantage rather than something to admire. If a school exists to provide services the public wants, I'm not sure why you would see food and buses as burdens.

        For that matter, I have noticed many people on the left implying that students with special needs are a special burden that public schools shouldn't have to bear the way they do after NCLB. I don't know if that it what you are implying, but I assure you, charter schools do accept students with special needs because they have to by law.

        I'm sorry if I sound perturbed, I'm simply tired of the left getting basic facts about charters completely wrong because they read some blog or essay somewhere. After all, Obama supports charters- is he completely wrong?

        The only part I would agree with you is questioning whether the charter system is sustainable. But I would argue that it may be because their teachers are paid substantially less on average than other teachers- that could have the effect of sapping talent that charters need to keep students.

        And in the end, that is the challenge of charters- they have to keep up some sort of standard or else parents will just leave. And in poor charters they have. Unfortunately, when a neighborhood school is underperforming, parents don't have that choice. As an educator, I don't know what I would tell such a parent who desperately needs a better education for the child now, while people on the left want to block it for unknown or false reasons.

        •  I am not against charters, actually (0+ / 0-)

          I think they can provide some really terrific experiences and alternatives for some families and some kids, when done right. But there is no magic about them, and it's become clear that their best role is as a niche - a place where kids who want or need something different can go, not unlike magnet schools or other special schools operated inside public districts. In many cases, they are reactions to districts that have become simply too large.

          Charter schools do accept some students with special needs, but they are not obligated to develop services for them in the same way that a public school is. So for example, if I want to enroll my profoundly autistic child at a KIPP school and they don't have the staff or facilities to meet his needs with an appropriate program, they don't have to take him. When you look at the data, the IEP/Special Ed kids that are present at most charters are high functioning kids that need minimal extra help, in aggregate.

          I am fully supportive of special ed services and the importance of an appropriate education for every child. But, I can still be critical of how we finance it. Special ed should be fully funded at the federal level and it should follow the child, such that uneven burdens are not placed on districts that happen to get more than their share, districts that can range from a few hundred students to hundreds of thousands of students.

          Here is a random article comparing charter results and populations. There are many out there; I highly recommend a thorough reading at schoolfinance101.

          http://schoolfinance101.wordpress.com/...

          Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

          by elfling on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 08:25:35 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  In my area, where schools have excess capacity (0+ / 0-)

          students are relatively free to move to any public school their parents can get them to. I happen to live in a place where several districts come together, and our district has enrolled kids from all three adjacent districts, and has sent kids to all three adjacent districts as well.

          There are charters that perform substantially worse than the home schools based on their test scores, and yet parents still rally around them and fight their closure. The question there is, are the parents wrong or are the tests wrong?

          I support school choice among public schools; I think it provides a release and an option to all kinds of situations. I would like to see the money follow the child on an ADA basis in all states - that ridiculous situation in Ohio where a parent was thrown in jail for enrolling her child in a school based on her father's residence is a horror.

          But charters aren't magic, and we have to provide good schooling options for every child. And I especially think that every charter should be governed by a nonprofit entity with a publicly chosen board  and have the same open meeting accountability as a public school.

          Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

          by elfling on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 08:33:26 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  For-profit corporations are running a scam (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tommyfocus2003

    in my state and in others targeting K-12 students and their parents. I wrote a diary on this a year ago. They are still doing this.

    It's a scheme that funnels tax dollars intended for public schools to corporations that provide full-time online "education." The practice is continuing this year. I continually see slick TV ads for one of the corporations, Connections Academy, recruiting more victims. The other company, K12, Inc. is still in business and expanding too.

    Cantor would love these guys.

    •  Except when the student unenrolls (0+ / 0-)

      The money doesn't stay with the school. I am commenting a lot on this thread because it seems like many people on DK don't understand this basic process by which we fund education.

      •  I hadn't thought about that. (0+ / 0-)

        There will be plenty of drop-outs. After a few weeks or a couple of months of full-time online classes a significant number of kids will bail out.

        Schools report their enrollment on Oct. 1 (in Iowa) and receive state funds based on that number. If the open-enrolled online students drop out after they are counted, I don't know what happens to the money. If the online corporation get to keep the money, that would really stink. Suck in recruits with slick marketing, keep then entertained until the enrollment count date, then when they drop out, keep the money for the rest of the school year.

        •  In states with Magic Days like Iowa (0+ / 0-)

          the school who has the student on Oct 1 keeps the money, even if the student has returned to his home public school by October 7.

          Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

          by elfling on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 10:20:44 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  It depends on the state (0+ / 0-)

        In some states, there is a Magic Day when the whole funding for the year for that school is determined. In others, it's based on daily attendance.

        K-12 inc, the online school behemoth, is actually notorious for their skill in gaming the school finance system to maximize their profits, while providing what by any measure is a piss-poor education.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Thu Feb 07, 2013 at 10:19:44 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  No, No, No... (0+ / 0-)

    to vouchers, charter schools and for-profit colleges/student loan schemes & scams.  All of them hurt public education, community & state colleges and universities.  It is easy to understand the underlying motivation of the right wing Republican/starve government ideologues in supporting all of those.  No.  No.  No.

  •  Aren't for profit colleges all jokes? (0+ / 0-)

    "Victory means exit strategy, and it's important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is." - George W Bush

    by jfern on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:15:02 PM PST

  •  Vouchers, charters and for profit colleges... (0+ / 0-)

    More tax payer money to support GOP donors!  (In all fairness, the Dems have supported one or another of these, and all three...)

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