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U.S. Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid (C) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (R) lead a rally to celebrate the start of the Affordable Care Act (commonly known as Obamacare) at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, October 1, 2013. The U.S. government be
New insurance rates for plans on the health insurance exchanges created under Obamacare are going to be announced this fall and they are almost certainly going to include rate hikes of varying degrees. That will create an inevitable anti-Obamacare narrative for Republicans in the waning weeks of the campaign. But this time, Democrats are going to be ready.
For months, the half-dozen White House communications and policy aides have been assembling state-by-state histories of health insurance rates before the Affordable Care Act was implemented, the drop-offs between initial rate proposals and final rates, and an analysis of the law’s effects and projections for 2015—all condensed to fit on a two-page background and talking points document tailored for each state.

Then they wait, closely tracking developments in the states in order to be ready to pounce when rates are announced.

When they see a state preparing to announce premium proposals, McGuinness emails Reid’s and Pelosi’s offices, who then connect her team with the chiefs of staff and press aides for every Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation. They put together policy and communications briefings for the members’ staffs, and occasionally the members themselves.

That context is critical—insurance premium rates have never not increased, in any market. Republicans are going to have to count on general amnesia of that fact in order for their campaign to succeed with anyone other than the rabidly anti-Obamacare base. This time, Democrats are going to be ready to counter.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:29 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (35+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:29:38 AM PDT

  •  Thank goodness. The positive story is so much (5+ / 0-)

    more compelling than the negative nits. I just hope we stick with it. And how about some more reports from HHS and CDC as well as liberal academics on coverage numbers, doctor visits, preventive screenings, increase in numbers of participating insurers, etc.

    Further, affiant sayeth not. 53959

    by Gary Norton on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:36:57 AM PDT

    •  You're getting what you pay for (4+ / 0-)

      The other positive spin is to remind people of the bad old practices the law stopped:  like banning pre-existing conditions, making sure women and men pay the same, or stopping insurance cancellations for illness.  

      Rates have always gone up, usually by a lot.  But before the bill became law you often didn't get what you paid for.  Now you do.

      I stand with triv33. Shame on her attackers.

      by Dallasdoc on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:31:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Here's the problem, doc... (4+ / 0-)
        New insurance rates for plans on the health insurance exchanges created under Obamacare are going to be announced this fall and they are almost certainly going to include rate hikes of varying degrees.
        When health care is run through for-profit corporations, rate hikes are a certainty. But the political nightmare doesn't end just because we want to put facts into context.

        American voters won't bother to put ANYTHING into context. They will see the endless "Insurance Premiums Skyrocket Under Obamacare" ads being run (particularly in states with vulnerable senate Dems) and latch on to the narrative.

        And thus, we arrive at the problem with Obamacare:

        When ANYTHING is tied to insurance industry profits, it is doomed to screw the American public. It is not a matter of if, but when. Had we fought the war in 2009-2010 and reformed health care the right way, we would have put for-profit crooks out of business. Now, we hope that the public sees "context" when their premiums go up in price.

        But hey, at least we "passed health care reform"...

        Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

        by Love Me Slender on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:57:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Unaffordable but historically projected! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Shaylors Provence, DarkestHour

          See my comment down below about how affordability is the only thing with political relevance and how "unaffordable but great" and "unaffordable but historically projected" aren't going to placate the public.

          The fact the Democrats have messaging that's "all condensed to fit on a two-page background and talking points document" (!) should sound warning sirens.

          A Republican president with a principled left or a Democratic president with an acquiescent left -- and something about voting and a greater evil.

          by Sucker Politics on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:23:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Oh, I completely agree (3+ / 0-)

          I think the ACA is a piece of shit law in its basic outline, with some good parts hung like Christmas ornaments onto it.  The basic mistake of relying on private insurers with no public competitor and depending upon regulation to make them behave is so, uh, naive that you have to wonder why they thought anybody would fall for their excuse for the corruption.

          Obamacare will own the premium hikes that occur like turning leaves every year, thanks to Republican propagandists.  The smart way to turn the tables would be to propose a public option to provide low-cost competition, but that's not going to happen anytime soon.

          I stand with triv33. Shame on her attackers.

          by Dallasdoc on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:30:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  yeah, the emphasis on slowing the rate (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sucker Politics, DarkestHour

          of increase of premiums is a completely disingenuous sleight-of-hand.

          For instance, even if you decrease the acceleration of a car a little bit, the car will still continue to go faster and faster. Yes, the velocity is increasing at a slower rate, but it's still increasing. Likewise, even if the rate of increase of premiums decreases, the premiums will still increase.

          So when people look at their insurance bills and say "My premiums are still going up! I can't afford this shit!" they won't be too happy when the Democrats reply "We didn't say your premiums would go down, we said they would go up slightly more slowly!"

          Especially since wages are still decreasing in this country, as they have been for over a generation. So obviously, merely decreasing the rate of increase of premiums is not enough.

          "In America, the law is king." --Thomas Paine

          by limpidglass on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:59:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Condensed differential calculus (0+ / 0-)

            In the spirit of the Democrats' usual messaging blunder of being overly cerebral, which in this case means number-crunching messaging that's "condensed to fit on a two-page background and talking points document tailored for each state," it wouldn't surprise me in the least if they were to trot out a 'condensed' 50-page treatise on differential calculus to distribute to the public.

            They could have the premium-time graph minimized to the size of a dime, with an enlarged first-derivative graph that has a bright red arrow pointing to its little dip.

            Democratic messaging -- winning hearts and minds.

            A Republican president with a principled left or a Democratic president with an acquiescent left -- and something about voting and a greater evil.

            by Sucker Politics on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 05:43:51 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  The rate proposals in my state are already here (0+ / 0-)

          And so far, they're not going up by much if at all.

          --United Citizens defeated Citizens United...This time. --

          by chipoliwog on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 04:56:59 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  The narrative that projects rate hikes everywhere (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bufffan20, ybruti

          is accepted inside the Beltway and in the MSM, but it is contradicted by actual data reported by brainwrap at ACA Signups. Here is the most recent of a number of such stories he has done.

          Mississippi: 1 of 2 Insurance Carriers to cut rates by 25% for 2015

          Mississippi! I know! (as Bill Maher always says)

          Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

          by Mokurai on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 12:19:30 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Good. (4+ / 0-)

    I certainly hope the Dems make the most of it and don't back down.

    There are, in every age, new errors to be rectified, and new prejudices to be opposed. ~Samuel Johnson (1709-1784)

    by slksfca on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:36:58 AM PDT

  •  About goddamned time. Five years of watching (5+ / 0-)

    Them all run scared from it became sickening to see 4 9/10s years ago.

    "What could possibly go wrong?" - United States Supreme Court Justices

    by Fordmandalay on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:44:03 AM PDT

    •  I agree - I mean what the fuck? (0+ / 0-)

      The messaging on Obama care from the Democrats has been politically incompetent.

      The article says this: 'The White House and its allies know they’ve been beaten in every previous round of Obamacare messaging, never more devastatingly than in 2010. And they know the results this November could hinge in large part on whether that happens again.'

      And isn't that the truth! Obama and the Democrats messaging has been political malpractice. It is infuriating and inexplicable.  

      It's a huge failing of Obama who needs to channel Bill Clinton, or something. But the Dems have been losing badly on thi issue for 5 years now when they shouldbe winning, the facts are on their side.

      It's disgraceful really. It's like Obama didn't want to go out on a limb, so he just sat back and got slowly destroyed.  

      Give the people a choice between a Republican and a Republican and they will vote for the Republican every time - Harry S Truman

      by mr market on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:57:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Why are rates going up? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    There's  no valid  reason what so ever for rates to go up. We already pay too much for health insurance.

    I sing praises in the church of nonsense, but in my heart I'm still an atheist, demanding sense of all things.

    by jbou on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:45:25 AM PDT

    •  Ever heard of inflation? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TheLizardKing, Deep Texan

      Seems that unless the economy totally collapses even to an extent greater than the Great Recession since we had no deflation associated with it,  some inflation is guaranteed.  

      •  Why is it guaranteed? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shaylors Provence

        the way services are priced is not related to the inflation we see when it comes to creating and selling goods.

        Has the cost of doing business for the health insurance industry really gone up?

        I sing praises in the church of nonsense, but in my heart I'm still an atheist, demanding sense of all things.

        by jbou on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:29:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Costs also go up because there is almost no (0+ / 0-)

        transparency in how the prices for medical goods and services.

        "The truest measure of compassion lies not in our service of those on the margins, but in our willingness to see ourselves in kinship with them." Father Gregory Boyle, Homeboy Industries

        by Mr MadAsHell on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:23:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Oddly, it seems that argument doesn't hold as m... (0+ / 0-)

        Oddly, it seems that argument doesn't hold as much weight when it comes to the minimum wage. Or Social Security. We could eat hamburger instead of steak. Or something. But boy howdy do inflation and cost of living sure matter when it comes to justifying rising health insurance premiums.

        By the way, if your political messaging revolves around defending health insurance premium hikes to the American people, it's gonna be a long 2 years.

    •  whether or not we pay too much (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jbou, FloridaSNMOM, Deep Texan

      or not is not the question here.  rates always go up, like everything else.  doesn't your auto insurance change every 6 months, and usually not to a lower amount regardless of your driving history?  the real story here is that the rate hikes will be a percentage less than in the past in most cases and the hikes have to be justified.  also the insurance companies have to use a very high percentage of the premiums to provide service or rebate the over payment so they have less incentive to gouge their customers at rate hike time.  this is at least what i understand about the subject.

      ps: i love your silliness diaries.  i steal your lines all the time and put them into my conversations.  some people think i am quite clever rather than that i am just a sneak thief.  i do tell others that i get the quips from you.

      "I am an old woman, named after my mother. my old man is another child who's grown old." John Prine (not an old woman)

      by art ah zen on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:03:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  My auto insurance has gone down (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        art ah zen

        The last two times I renewed. It does depend on your driving record.

        What are some of your favorites that you use?

        I sing praises in the church of nonsense, but in my heart I'm still an atheist, demanding sense of all things.

        by jbou on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:24:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  and what coverage you've selected (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          virginislandsguy

          i can buy cheap car insurance.

          i choose to buy more expensive coverage for a variety of reasons, including lower deductible.

          your cheap insurance may have a high deductible or may not cover very much.

          -You want to change the system, run for office.

          by Deep Texan on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 12:36:23 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  are you describing bronze plans in the ACA, (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            limpidglass

            or car insurance?

            your cheap insurance may have a high deductible or may not cover very much.
            A few days ago, a Kossack posted that her health plan is the same as pre-ACA:  "don't get sick".  Like many low-income folks, she has an annual $6,000 out-of-pocket deductible and while grateful for the subsidized monthly payments, will still not be able to address any health issues beyond the basic free physicals.  So the good news is, you can now have certain health screenings.  The bad news is, you won't be able to treat most of the problems that such screenings turn up.

            That's exactly what pro-health CARE critics described would be the case.  But they weren't invited to the secret pro-INSURANCE meetings the president held, while he was still pretending he'd entertain single payer, then public option.  Remember all our hearings and petitions to get real health CARE reform?  All the while we were knocking ourselves out, his secret committee was ironing out the details without so much as a glance at single payer or public option.  Not surprising:  his choice to write the bill? Not a prominent public health doctor nor policy researcher who'd studied various ideas, but Wellpoint insurance executive Liz Fowler.

            •  remember all the times (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bufffan20

              we were promised health care reform and the rwnjs kept it from happening?  sorry, this is not the best that could have been done but it is better than anything that went before it.

              "I am an old woman, named after my mother. my old man is another child who's grown old." John Prine (not an old woman)

              by art ah zen on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 06:56:18 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  The bronze and silver plans are absolute dog shit. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Shaylors Provence

              I was an avid Firedoglake reader back in 2009 and they were only big blog on the left that took an honest look at the premiums, subsidies, deductibles, and out-of-pocket limits on the lower-tier plans.   They are awful.   Working-class people still can't afford to get sick.  And I remember very well when Max Baucus thanked Liz Fowler for writing the fucking bill.  That was embarrassing, or at least it should have been, but Team Blue was too busy cheering for this monstrosity.  They still are.

            •  Serious misinformation. (0+ / 0-)

              1.  The bronze plans are a terrible choice for low income people with potentially expensive health issues.  The bronze plans are intended for people who are healthy and only need a plan to forestall bankruptcy in the unlikely event that they get hit by a bus.

              2.  The silver plans, for low income folks, are actually the sweet spot of the ACA.  If your income is low, not only are the premiums subsidized but the out of pocket expenses are significantly limited.  For someone near the poverty line, a silver plan is effectively a platinum plan.

              For example:

              A 35 year old residing in Mobile County, Alabama, with an income of $12,000, can get a silver plan with a $7 (that's seven) dollar monthly premium, a $100 premium, and a $500 out of pocket maximum, with $10 deductibles for most common services.

              Hardly dog crap.

              We are the principled ones, remember? We don't get to use the black hats' tricks even when it would benefit us. Political Compass: -6.88, -6.41

              by bmcphail on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:56:29 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  erratum (0+ / 0-)

                a $100 deductible

                We are the principled ones, remember? We don't get to use the black hats' tricks even when it would benefit us. Political Compass: -6.88, -6.41

                by bmcphail on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:58:32 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Not true. The silver family plans are awful. (0+ / 0-)

                Don't take my word for it.  You can use any of the available online subsidy calculators to see how bad they are for a working class family with kids.  Even with the subsidies it's still a "don't get sick" plan.   I've long been aware of how bad these plans are because Jon Walker and Marcy Wheeler reported the numbers back in 2009.

                •  Not true? (0+ / 0-)

                  Are you telling me that my figures, taken directly from healthcare.gov, are incorrect?

                  This was in response to a post complaining that the bronze and silver plans are bad for low income people.  

                  Well, $12,000 is low income.

                  "a working class family with kids" is shifting the ground of the argument.

                  Still….

                  A family of four (35, 33, 5, 3) with a family income of $35,000, residing in Mobile, AL:

                  Silver plan with a monthly premium of $137/mo, an annual deductible of $800/yr, and an annual out of pocket limit of $2000/yr.  Copay for primary doctor $30.  Specialist $40. Generic prescriptions $10.  

                  Not to mention the fact that a long list of routine health maintenance items are zero copay, and that no one can deny them for a preexisting condition or boot them for getting sick.

                  If you want to argue that the costs go up too fast as the incomes of the couple go up, you won't get any static from me.  I think the subsidy schedule is not nearly generous enough and needs fixing.  But low- to moderate-income families don't come off badly.

                  We are the principled ones, remember? We don't get to use the black hats' tricks even when it would benefit us. Political Compass: -6.88, -6.41

                  by bmcphail on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:56:12 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  The biggest losers under the current law (0+ / 0-)

                    are older, relatively well to do families, for which the subsidies do not apply.  They really do get screwed, a situation that needs fixing.

                    And of course the really poor in states that refused the expansion.

                    We are the principled ones, remember? We don't get to use the black hats' tricks even when it would benefit us. Political Compass: -6.88, -6.41

                    by bmcphail on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:58:14 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I agree: the wealthy are shabbily treated (0+ / 0-)

                      under Obamacare.

                      Perhaps they should be given yet another tax cut they don't need.

                      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain. A lie is half way around the world before the truth can get its shoes on. -- Mark Twain.

                      by JJustin on Fri Jul 11, 2014 at 07:52:38 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

            •  Remember all the times that President Obama (0+ / 0-)

              didn't work to implement the law, so wasn't threatened with law suit and impeachment as a result?

              Do you not realize that had he begun his first term by pandering to the whining "Progressives," the suit and impeachment nonsense would have begun then?

              This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain. A lie is half way around the world before the truth can get its shoes on. -- Mark Twain.

              by JJustin on Fri Jul 11, 2014 at 07:40:39 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  sorry, car insurance was a bad choice. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jbou

          mine went up because of a newer car.

          some of my current faves:
          Hey people who live in glass houses: the rest of us call them "greenhouses". You're basically living in a shed. So get over yourself.

          Mischief is the most beautiful thing about this dull existence we call life.

          There’s no future in reality.

          Wake up, sheeple. Ronald McDonald and Wendy both have red hair. Our burger supply is controlled by a secret cabal of gingers. (I have red hair.)

          thank you for all the chuckles i have gotten from reading your diary for a while.  it always amuses and there are times it is touching too.  

          "I am an old woman, named after my mother. my old man is another child who's grown old." John Prine (not an old woman)

          by art ah zen on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 02:31:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  On hearing a witty quip (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        art ah zen, Elwood Dowd
        Oscar Wilde once said, "Oh, I wish I'd said that!"

        "Don't worry, Oscar," said his friend James McNeill Whistler, "You will."

        It is for this reason that all quotations at Uncyclopedia are attributed to Wilde. The rule is that material posted at Uncyclopedia must be

        a) Funny

        1) False

        Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

        by Mokurai on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 12:23:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Insurance. (2+ / 0-)

        Its designed to be profitable for  . . . insurers.  Don't lose sight of the fact that it's not a bug . . . it's a feature.

        Our president and congress and lobbyists and all the rest of them decided to tie my health care to the profitability of some company.  

        Hard to get around that.  

        "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

        by Rikon Snow on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:32:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  because our system is built around corporations (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jbou, Shaylors Provence

      if you want an end to this bullshit, you need socialist health care.

  •  This is just in time - needs to be widespread (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slksfca, art ah zen, FloridaSNMOM

    and repetitive.  

    The ACA isn't out of the woods yet:

    Obamacare's Biggest Threat

    "The truest measure of compassion lies not in our service of those on the margins, but in our willingness to see ourselves in kinship with them." Father Gregory Boyle, Homeboy Industries

    by Mr MadAsHell on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 10:52:05 AM PDT

  •  Congrats to Obama admin for collaborating... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    ...with the states, employers, and ins ind to add delays and grace periods for corporate compliance with ACA so as to mitigate their cost and pain of transitions.

    Now, do the same for the public. Mandate a year of no rate changes as new systems and services cool down into stability.

    •  Oh but the general public doesn't have the CoC... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shaylors Provence

      ...brow-beating the administration and HHS for these delays. You see, we're not worthy.

      Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

      by Love Me Slender on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:58:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Calling imlementation plan changes "delays" (0+ / 0-)

        ...is ignorance wrt scale and complexity and the entire country being impacted. I shouldn't have used the term "delay". I guess one a'hole's delay is another's agility, flexibility.

        •  Oh bull fucking shit... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Shaylors Provence, limpidglass

          If you think for a minute that the delays to business mandates to provide health insurance for employees (or suffer fines) reflected "agility" and "flexibility" instead of political expediency, then you are either clueless or willfully obtuse.

          There is a point where you have to stop spinning and start getting real. The truth is, none of the law's aspects should have been delayed...NONE. There were reasons for the business mandate...namely, to:

          1. Provide insurance for employees who were not offered insurance previously

          2. Provide a revenue stream for subsidies in case some businesses opted to pay the fines.

          In either case, allowing the business mandate to be delayed has weakened funding for the law and allowed businesses to keep pocketing large profits while the rest of us are held to the mandate, sans delay. That's bullshit any way you slice it.

          Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

          by Love Me Slender on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:19:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Agree, not that I'm full of bull fucking shit... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Love Me Slender

            ...at the moment, but regarding the rest, I should have added to my tongue-in-cheek congrats:

            I guess one a'hole's delay is another's agility, flexibility and another's political expediency.
             
            •  Oh for crying out loud...I'm so sorry... (0+ / 0-)

              Sometimes my sarcasm meter is broken. Please accept my apologies.

              Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

              by Love Me Slender on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:26:34 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  It's even worse than you make it out to be. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Shaylors Provence, Jon Says

            Obama suspended enforcement of the business mandate and didn't even pretend that there was anything in the text of the law that allowed it.  Pandora's Box is opened. It is now 100% guaranteed that if the next President is a Republican he will try to suspend enforcement of parts of the ACA that he doesn't like.  I don't see what would stop Republican presidential candidates from actually campaigning on doing exactly that.

  •  "Go tell it on the mountain" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slksfca, Deep Texan

    and everywhere!  everytime the rwnjs open their big bazoos, open up a can of factual whip ass on their behinds!  

    "I am an old woman, named after my mother. my old man is another child who's grown old." John Prine (not an old woman)

    by art ah zen on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:05:01 AM PDT

  •  What are they doing regarding implementation of (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    the employer mandate?

    The effort you're taking about seems to be in the individual market, i.e. the current exchanges.

    •  They have totally abandoned the employer mandat... (0+ / 0-)

      They have totally abandoned the employer mandate. I seriously doubt it will ever be fully implemented. It would raise unemployment to much.

      •  Yep...it'll be the first thing from this law... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        limpidglass, Shaylors Provence

        ...to go FOR GOOD.

        Yet the mandates for individuals will remain. Funny how that happens...under Democratic watch.

        Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

        by Love Me Slender on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 11:59:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The employer mandate is almost certainly DEAD. (0+ / 0-)

          If this President won't enforce it then I can't imagine the next President will volunteer for that duty.  It's not looking like Obama has any enthusiasm for enforcing it.  He might delay implementation until he's slipping out the door in early 2017, but the next President will just promptly cancel it.  Hillary won't stick her neck out to enforce it, and certainly no Republican will.

      •  then the result will be obvious (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shaylors Provence

        employers will start dumping their employees onto the exchanges in order to save costs. Instead of being able to take advantage of the bargaining power and savings in efficiency of large employers negotiating group rates with insurers, employers will have to negotiate one on one with insurers--and get crappier deals as a result.

        Employer-based health insurance is a shitty way to provide people access to health care, but at least it was a way. Now that way will disappear, and we'll have nothing but the lousy exchanges. Except for Medicare patients. Who will eventually be tossed into the same boat as the rest of us.

        That was always the whole point of this exercise: creeping privatization.

        "In America, the law is king." --Thomas Paine

        by limpidglass on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 02:14:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Do you have any other info (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Naniboujou

        Or links on this? I work for a municipality and was just told that we have to cut all part time employees working 30 hours or more to under that or the city would have to offer them health insurance in 2015. I have some pretty upset employees on my hands.

  •  And then what do they do with them? (0+ / 0-)
    They put together policy and communications briefings for the members’ staffs, and occasionally the members themselves.
    Wait until the Repubs unleash their attacks to respond defensively?  That is, of course, the most likely scenarios since we are talking about Democrats who are not known for being proactive or on offense.  Now if they said they would immediately release this information to put the new rates in context and defuse the inevitable Repub lies and distortions, then I'd be impressed.

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 12:04:47 PM PDT

  •  This isn't just good for November (0+ / 0-)

    or even for the current ACA, but will (can, should) underpin efforts for single payer later on.  Draw them a picture of what's happened and you'll still have the hard right fighting for total repeal, but if the ACA dies, it will more likely be by 1000 cuts.  Like the Hobby Lobby decision.

    I'll believe corporations are people when one comes home from Afghanistan in a body bag.

    by mojo11 on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 12:54:54 PM PDT

  •  Ugh! Completely hopeless! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    It seems Democrats are once again preparing an overly cerebral messaging strategy that will be politically inert at best.

    All that's going to matter for the average American is whether the rates are AFFORDABLE ("Affordable Care Act").

    If the rates are affordable, then that pretty much sells itself, and any messaging can fit on a business card in 24 pt font.

    If the rates are not affordable, then the Democrats are completely screwed, and no amount of number-crunching lipstick will help. "Unaffordable but great" and "unaffordable but historically projected" aren't going to placate the public. The Democrats promised affordability, and unless the Democrats were grossly incompetent, this affordability subsumed all of the predictable corporate plays.

    A Republican president with a principled left or a Democratic president with an acquiescent left -- and something about voting and a greater evil.

    by Sucker Politics on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:14:44 PM PDT

    •  "Condensed" (0+ / 0-)

      "all condensed to fit on a two-page background and talking points document tailored for each state."

      *facepalm*

      A Republican president with a principled left or a Democratic president with an acquiescent left -- and something about voting and a greater evil.

      by Sucker Politics on Mon Jul 07, 2014 at 03:26:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  great point (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sucker Politics
      If the rates are affordable, then that pretty much sells itself, and any messaging can fit on a business card in 24 pt font.
      Limpidglass nails it, too, with the comment that
      Employer-based health insurance is a shitty way to provide people access to health care, but at least it was a way. Now that way will disappear, and we'll have nothing but the lousy exchanges. Except for Medicare patients. Who will eventually be tossed into the same boat as the rest of us.

      That was always the whole point of this exercise: creeping privatization.

      I find it demeaning that citizens should be grovelling in thanks that the Dems have prepared two-page talking point summaries, customized to each state, to defend the indefensible.  
  •  "Health care" is not equivalent to "insurance." (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    Except in America.  Profit is everything.

    "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

    by Rikon Snow on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:34:16 PM PDT

    •  Pretty meaningless (0+ / 0-)

      You could also say that auto body work is not equivalent to auto collision insurance.   True, but it's the insurance that makes it possible for you to pay for the body work after you get in an accident.  By the same token, medical insurance helps you to pay for the care you need after you get sick or have an accident.  And med insurance (at least under the ACA) also contains a preventative component by covering basic exams and tests.  

      Yes, we do live in a society in which money is used to pay for services.  Insurance is a way of covering those costs when they happen.  I'm not sure what alternative you're suggesting.  

  •  My family has tons of experience with med bills. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shaylors Provence

    Mom had cancer (three times) for years and years, the family made too much to qualify for state aid but not enough to stay afloat with our private insurance. We were never able to get her life insurance because she had pre-cancer as a teen. My parents considered getting a divorce to help with med bills, if she'd have lived another year we would have lost the house, etc...

    Point is, six years later, Dad finally was able to crawl out from under the pile of bills and get them paid, and it is what it is.

    Healthcare reform was a big deal to me personally, as well as the rest of my family.

    Dad told me that he looked into all the Obamacare exchange options, and they were all more expensive than the (competent but expensive) private plan he has now. So basically, the ACA didn't do dick for him, and isn't that fucked up?

    Nothing in these two-page summaries is going to convince my Dad (or anyone else in his boat, and there are plenty) that this has really solved any major problem with healthcare.

    And don't even go there with "it's better than nothing!" An absolutely historic opportunity in 2008 squandered for the sake of appeasing the Neoliberal status-quo. Good luck with that, guys.

    •  I feel I am missing part of the story.... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bufffan20

      Are any of the following true?

      1. Your dad maintains insurance through his work the whole time, so he never had to worry about 'getting insurance'? (Before the ACA he never could have bought an individual policy with your mother's history - but now he can get something guaranteed.)

      2. Your dad makes over 100k, so he isn't eligible for any premium subsidies. So he looks a the prices on his current plan and since it is Obamacare compliant, it is in line with the exchanges.  

      I understand 'Medicare for all' would be the better solution... but there are many families that this law helps.

       

      Give the people a choice between a Republican and a Republican and they will vote for the Republican every time - Harry S Truman

      by mr market on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:06:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shaylors Provence

        This is the only comment I am going to reply to questioning either the truthfulness of my account or my basic knowledge of this law.

        1: 1. Your dad maintains insurance through his work the whole time, so he never had to worry about 'getting insurance'?
        Yes. My dad has worked for the same place for 10 years and is covered through his employer. It's actually fairly common.
        (Before the ACA he never could have bought an individual policy with your mother's history - but now he can get something guaranteed.)
        No shit? Gee, thanks for putting me in the know. You're wrong about not being able to find coverage with a cancer-ridden wife, by the way; it can be done, it's just pretty fucking expensive. I'm going to assume that my family has more expertise in this area than you do personally.

        The whole point of my previous comment wasn't that Dad isn't able to find coverage; it's that all of the ACA plans were too expensive and of no help to him. So that "something guaranteed" isn't really helping bring the costs down, is it? Which brings me to your next assumption...

        2. Your dad makes over 100k, so he isn't eligible for any premium subsidies.
        You are a fool. Do you really think you can make such an assumption from what I said above?

         My dad's a mechanic and he makes 30-40 grand a year, and no, I am not going to provide further details. The experiences in my Dad's life has made it so he doesn't fuck around with insurance; he has a good plan and he pays out the nose for it like everyone else. All the ACA plans that offered the same thing were more expensive than what he has now.

        I understand 'Medicare for all' would be the better solution... but there are many families that this law helps.
        That's very true, and I'm glad. And you can say "your dad who makes $35,000 a year is in pretty good shape and this law is designed to help poorer people", but good fucking luck with that in the elections. The fact is, there is still a huge part of the middle/lower-middle class that is still being told that they make too much money for any kind of assistance, but are still being smothered by high healthcare costs.

        And none of those people are going to be going Yoo Rah Rah Sis Boom Bah over these weak-sauce talking points. Everybody knows what we should have gone for, and everybody knows how it was shot in backroom deals with the very people who make American healthcare so barbaric.

    •  Does your father ever look beyond himself? (0+ / 0-)

      You say that the ACA made a big difference to you and you family.  Does the fact this his children now have protection they didn't have before mean nothing at all to your father?  Does he see everything in terms of whether it directly benefits him himself?  

      Speaking for myself, the ACA won't affect me personally much since I have good employer coverage guaranteed for life.  But I am delighted and relieved that I won't have to worry about my children being ruined by unexpected medical costs.  Or for that matter, my friends and neighbors and indeed, my fellow countrymen.  

      •  Hmm. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shaylors Provence
        Does the fact this his children now have protection they didn't have before mean nothing at all to your father?  Does he see everything in terms of whether it directly benefits him himself?  
        No, but perhaps my comment above lends itself to that image.

        Of course things like pre-existing conditions and overhead requirements benefit everyone, and he and I both know that.

        However, this particular story is about Dem messaging about the ACA's impact on health care costs. That was what spurred me to make my post, and my point stands: this is pretty weak tea, considering the things Dems didn't even try to fight for.

  •  Let's see what the DC Court of Appeals says first. (0+ / 0-)

    Not to be a Debby Downer, but it will be awfully hard to champion the PPACA with a ruling gutting the law. I sure hope they're prepared for this contingency.


    ODS results in Obama's amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

    by NoFortunateSon on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:46:44 PM PDT

  •  Isn't there a simple solution? (0+ / 0-)

    One that has been there all along? Get on board and make it better for the people of the United States of America. Not the disjointed all out warfare bullshit for getting re-elected. For fuck sake these people play bull shit games while the supposed "Americans" that they claim to represent watch on the side lines and wonder what the fuck America has come to...

    If any harm has come to America it isn't from the outside...it's from the harm that America and it's two party system beholding to money have created from the inside while the outside laughs at the ineptitude.

    You guys are supposed to be the guiding light and beacon to the world? Me thinks not...

    Men with religious beliefs have killed more people than any god that they have created...

    by Mislead on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:44:45 PM PDT

  •  We have been hearing (0+ / 0-)

    For about two years the rates are going up and they still have not.Sometimes this Joan McCarter isn't always right.I don't know where she's getting her info from that the rates are going up.It doesn't add up because in November that is when the new open enrollment starts meaning millions of more people will be getting healthcare.Rates are set by how many people are signing up for the ACA

    •  Huh? and HUH? Number one....Joan has always (0+ / 0-)

      better completely on top of anything related to the ACA and I have never seen her to be anything but right on.

      Number 2....the rates are going on in some states (maybe even a lot of states), hence the need for a proactive move to counter the obviously coming drama from the other side.  The rates will come out very soon and way before November's open enrollment, although they can later be changed or modified.

      Thank you, Joan, as always.

  •  And so... (0+ / 0-)

    ...we have yet another reason to implement a single-payer system.

    Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power -- Benito Mussolini

    by drcraigphd on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 08:50:38 AM PDT

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